Did you know that in the food-processing industry, temperature-sensing devices are available that can measure the temperature of the actual food rather than air surrounding it? Did you know some cooling tower biological control methods rely on toxic chemicals? Did you know that water is a more efficient heat transfer agent than air? If you answered no to any one of these questions, then the articles in this issue can help.

Did you know that in the food-processing industry, temperature-sensing devices are available that can measure the temperature of the actual food rather than air surrounding it?

Did you know some cooling tower biological control methods rely on toxic chemicals?

Did you know that water is a more efficient heat transfer agent than air?

Did you know you can use water to cool electronics?

If you answered no to any one of these questions, then don’t put down this magazine without reading all the contents. There also is more to learn than just the details surrounding those four questions when you explore all of the editorial in this issue.

Here’s a sample of the education that lies in wait for you.

A “Green” Option for Cooling Tower Biological Control by Timothy Keister, chief chemist at ProChemTech International Inc., Brockway, Pa. While biocides often are effective for cooling tower biological control, their use represents substantial health, safety and environmental concerns. Electrolysis-based bromine delivery can control microorganism growth in cooling tower water while avoiding the hazards posed by conventional biocides.

Recovering Profits by Reclaiming Industrial Gases by Terry Neese, specialty gas specialist for Airgas Gulf States, Theodore, Ala., and Joe Mansfield, vice president of refrigerant sales for Airgas Specialty Products, Thompsons Station, Tenn. As regulations have phased out the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), many engineers must decide what to do when their chillers still have a number of years of service remaining, yet the refrigerants they require are getting more costly and harder to find.

Effective Screening with Mechanical Filters by Thomas E. Hamilton, president of Power Products & Services Co., Battle Ground, Wash. Often, Cooling water supplied to reverse osmosis (RO) and other demineralization systems from wells and rivers must be pretreated to avoid fouling the RO membranes and compromising the performance of the water treatment system and downstream cooling operation. Using mechanical filters instead of multimedia systems can help.

Sensing Food Temperature at the Source by Dan Furner, vice president of public relations and marketing for eCube Energy, Salt Lake City, Utah. Most conventional refrigeration sensors do not sense food temperature. Instead, they sense the circulating air temperature, although air temperature changes far more quickly than the food temperature. Sensor technology resolves this problem by changing the way temperature is monitored and controlled.

Protecting Your Recirculating Chiller Investment by Joao Castro, applications engineer, and Harold Bufe, service manager, Lytron Inc., Woburn, Mass. Recirculating chillers are “off-the-shelf” liquid-cooling systems that offer precise temperature control and cooling below ambient temperatures. Selecting the appropriate options can ease operation and maintenance.

Cooling Electronics with Water by George A. Sites, director of engineering at Ametek HDR Power Systems, Columbus, Ohio. The life of high-powered electronic equipment is directly affected by its operating temperature. But if you could seal your equipment enclosure, you could keep it clean from day-to-day dirt, dust and grime in your plant. Water-cooling systems let you do just that.

A Water-Saving Solution for Chilling Plastics. This case history details how Goex Corp., a manufacturer of rigid plastic sheet and roll stock products based in Janesville, Wis., used a chiller system to reduce its water costs and meet increased production demands.

Anne Armel
Group Publisher
ArmelA@bnpmedia.com