Hydrodynamic cavitation occurs with intense, microscopically localized extremes of temperature, pressure and high-energy microjets.


Companies looking to “go green” by conserving and reusing the water discharged from cooling towers and evaporative condensers can use a water filtration system developed by VRTX Technologies, Schertz, Texas. The company notes that more than 50 percent of water not being used in agricultural applications is used for cooling. The chemical-free tool is intended for water conservation in cooling applications. According to the company, the technology allows users to save water and reuse the blowdown water from the cooling system for non-potable applications.

Hydrodynamic cavitation is the heart of the new technology. In the cavitation zone, two streams of water collide with kinetic energy and shear, spinning in opposite directions. In the core of these streams, according to the company, a region of near total vacuum is created, which degasses the flow. Under these conditions, hydrodynamic cavitation occurs with microscopically localized extremes of temperature, pressure and high-energy microjets.

The VRTX technology also provides water treatment service with filtration. Filtration tools include a centrifugal separator to filter out heavier contaminants in the water along with secondary filtration options such as bag or cartridge filters. According to the company, the technology is currently saving about 800 million gal of water a year using hydrodynamic cavitation to control scale, corrosion and bacteria in cooling applications.

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