The Association of Water Technologies’ 30th annual conference and exposition promises a lineup of informational sessions to equip attendees with tools and skills, networking opportunities to help attendees build long-term relationships with industry professionals, and an exhibition to allow attendees to touch and see new products and services for industrial water treatment. The 2015 event, planned for September 9-12 at the Omni Nashville Hotel and Music City Center in Nashville, maintains its exclusive focus on industrial water treatment.  Keynote speaker Robin Crow kicks off the event with his presentation, “Seven Steps to Rethink the Way You Do Business.” Author and motivational speaker Crow will offer practical takeaways such as how to adapt to a changing global economy and innovative ways to create organizational efficiency.

Beginning Thursday, September 10, AWT will present two tracks of educational sessions. Planned topics include using an inhibiting biocide to solve algae fouling problems in recirculating water systems, biofilm control in small- to medium-sized water treatment systems, biological testing of water, the prevention and remediation of ammonia-contaminated closed loops, the lay-up of steam generators with film-forming amines, an evaluation of the thermal stability of anti-scalants for aqueous systems, all-organic cooling water programs, and reverse osmosis scale prevention and control.

In addition to the concurrent tracks, AWT will present general sessions, including a town hall meeting for members, a presentation on Music City Center’s sustainability procedures and LEED certification, biological testing of water, lessons learned from the recent Legionella outbreak in Quebec, and the selection of polymers and phosphonates. On Thursday and Friday, manufacturers and service providers for the industrial water treatment market will exhibit products and services. Attendees can learn about new technologies and providers while networking face to face on the show floor.

For more information or to register, visit www.awt.org/annualconvention15

Scale and Deposit Control with AMSA

AMSA Inc. manufactures DTEA II, an organic deposit cleaner, penetrant aide and dispersant. DTEA II provides a Biofilm Control Program (BCP) when used with a biocide (now sold under the BCP 1000 label). DTEA II in typical acidic scale and corrosion one-drum formulas provides scale and deposit control, plus the full benefits of DTEA II.

AWT Booth 416

AMSA Inc.

989-662-0377

989-662-6461

www.amsainc.com

Corrosion Control Technologies from Cortec

Cortec Corp. is the global leader in innovative, environmentally responsible VpCI and MCI corrosion control technologies for packaging, metalworking, construction, electronics, water treatment, oil and gas, and other industries. Headquartered in St. Paul, Minn., Cortec manufactures more than 400 products distributed worldwide. ISO 9001:2008, ISO 14001:2004, and ISO 17025 certified.

AWT Booth 201

Cortec Corp. 651-429-1100

651-429-1122

www.cortecvci.com

FREE LITERATURE

Bosting Heat Exchanger Performance

Ovivo Online Debris Filters and Automatic Tube Cleaning System are designed to solve heat exchanger scaling and fouling issues; by removing suspended solids and circulating rubber cleaning balls to remove scale and deposits.

www.oviviowater.com

ovivio.energy@oviviowaterr.com

U.S. Water’s PhosZero Family of Cooling Water Treatment Products provide maximum protection against scale and corrosion without the use of phosphorus, resulting in the elimination of phosphorus discharge to the environment and enhanced environmental sustainability.

www.uswaterservices.com

Dynalene HC Engineering Guide

 Dynalene Inc. is a leading manufacturer of heat transfer fluids and coolants including glycols (propylene glycol, ethylene glycol, solar glycol, GeoGlycol, and BioGlycol) as well as other fluid chemistries such as potassium formate, hydrocarbons, and silicone oils. Dynalene HC heat transfer fluid is one of the most efficient heat transfer fluids on the market and is designed to operate at a much lower temperature than glycols due to its lower viscosity.